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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/4/2022 7:53:51 AM   
Hellway


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All this thinks are in the last V (6.0) from the link in the fisrst pages please ? Thanks.

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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/4/2022 6:47:34 PM   
asl3d


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39 Italian Carro Armato M13/40 T47

When it became apparent that the M11/39 did not constitute a satisfactory design, the development of a suitable successor was initiated. The basic hull of the M11 was used, but the rest was much revised and took on a conventional appearance (with a more powerful gun in a fully rotating turret) with horsepower increased from 105 to 125 to compensate for the added weight. The M13/40 was the best known of the Italian tanks used in the war, and along with its improved (a 145-hp engine was installed) version the M14/41, was the standard AFV of their armored divisions. The M13 suffered from frequent mechanical breakdowns in the desert, but in this respect was no worse than British tanks of the period. Its chief deficiencies were slow speed, unreliability, and a two-man turret in which the commander doubled as gunner. Nevertheless, in 1941 it became standard equipment in the growing number of medium tank battalions, and is perhaps the most famous Italian tank of WW2. Used in mass, or against enemy infantry, they can be quite effective however.
It first saw action with the III Battaglione Carri M in the Sollum-Halfaya area of Libya, and later equipped the 132° "Ariete" Divisione Corazzata (132nd "Ram" Armored Division) in North Africa. The M13/40 also saw action with the 131st "Centauro" (Centaur) and 133rd "Littorio" (Bundle of Fasces) Armored Divisions in the Greek-Yugoslav campaigns during January-April 1941. In September 1943, 22 were confiscated by the Germans who subsequently handed them over to the Fascist Italians. Sources conflict as to the total number of M13/40 produced, due to a number later being rebuilt as M14/41; some state as many as 1,049 while others claim only 710, but the figure most often given is 785. An M13/40 (or M14/41) platoon comprised four such tanks until late August 1941 when five were authorized.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/4/2022 6:59:52 PM   
asl3d


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Hellway

All this thinks are in the last V (6.0) from the link in the fisrst pages please ? Thanks.



Hi Hellway,

Indeed, everything he publishes here and on other Heroes de Stalingad treads subsequently is published in the "Documents Pack of Heroes and Leaders mod."

However, they are published first on the treads and then in the "Documents Pack." In the case of the Italian Army units, it is still being published on this tread, so you can't find it in the "Documents Pack" yet.

In the next update of the "Documents Pack" will appear the Italian Army, the new Desert Terrains as well as the updated Terrain Chart.

Best regards,

< Message edited by asl3d -- 2/4/2022 7:00:14 PM >


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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/5/2022 6:16:32 PM   
asl3d


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40 Italian Semovente M41 da 75/18 B75*:

The Semovente M41 da 75/18 B75 was inspired by the German Sturmgeschuetz III. The Italians designed a similar AFV in early 1941 using the M13/40 hull and chassis with a box-shaped super-structure and 75/18 howitzer. Apparently 60 were built before production was switched in the latter half of that year to the same vehicle based on the M14/41 tank, of which 162 were ordered. Unlike the StuG III, the SMV 75/18 was intended to provide support and flank protection for medium tank units. In addition, it was often pressed into service as a TD, since compared to the M13 and M14 its armor was somewhat thicker and its gun had a longer effective range. Two SMV 75/18 battalions (Gruppi Semovemi 75/18) were assigned to the artillery regiment of each armored division, and several independent gruppi existed as well. Each contained two (sometimes three, in 1943) batteries of four (sometimes six) SMV each.
The last model of the SMV 75/18, ordered in October 1942, was based on the M15/42 tank and originally was intended to carry the new 75/34 gun. However, by March 1943 this gun was still in development so it was decided to install the 75/18 howitzer in the interim. Instead of equipping only Gruppi Semoventi, some SMV M42 75/18 were issued to tank battalions pursuant to a change in the tables of organization of these units at the end of 1942; whereas the old organization had consisted of three medium tank companies, the new TO&E comprised one such company plus two companies of SMV 75/18. In September 1943, SMV M42 75/18 saw action in Italy against the Germans who subsequently confiscated a number of them. The exact number of SMV 75/18 produced is unknown, but 250 (inclusive of those built during the German occupation of Italy) is a generally accepted approximation.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/6/2022 4:32:43 PM   
asl3d


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41 Italian Semovente M42 da 75/32 B75

The Italians were in major part very satisfied with the anti-tank behavior of Semovente da 75/18 M40 or M41 but made the decision however to improve it by replacing the gun da 75/18 by the gun 75/34 in June 1941. However it was decided to install on the chassis of Semovente M41 the gun 75/32 modello 37. In October 1942 the Regio Esercito ordered to Ansaldo to mount the gun 75/34 on the hull of Semovente M42 (similar to Semovente da 75/18 M40 or M41 but based on the chassis of the medium tank M15/42). The Semovente da 75/34 M42M (M for Modificato) was accepted on April 29, 1943 and an order of 280 specimens had placed. The first vehicles left the lines of assembly in May 1943. In July 1943,93 specimens had been produced and 60 already delivered to their units. The Germans continued its manufacture, with 116 eventually being built, plus another 11 using the chassis of the StuG105/25(i). The StuG 75/18(i) and StuG 74/34(i) were the most common Italian AFV in German service in both Italy and the Balkans. In December 1943 they were in service with six infantry divisions, two panzer divisions, three Panzergrenadier divisions and one Gebirgsdivision in Italy and the Balkans. By 1944 most were supporting Infantry, Gebirgs, Jäger or Fallschirmjäger Divisions. The gun of 75 mm L/34 had a muzzle velocity of 557 m/sec and a maximum range of 12500 m.
In mid 1943 about 25 SMV M42 were equipped with a version of the 75/32 field gun. In September of that year they saw combat in the Rome area as part of the 135th "Ariete II" Armored Division. Subsequently, a number of those confiscated by the Germans were turned over to the Fascist Italians—as were some SMV 75/34.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/7/2022 6:12:40 PM   
asl3d


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42 Italian Semovente M43 da 105/25 B105

Nicknamed the "Bassotto" (Dachshund), the Ansaldo Semovente da 105/25 M43 was the most potent Italian-designed AFV of WW2. Originally it was to be built on the hull and chassis of the P26/40 heavy tank but, due to delays in the development of the latter, a much-modified version of the M15/42 was utilized instead. It was envisioned that, once the newest AFV types were available in numbers, SMV 75/34 would be used as TD while SMV 105/25 would provide close support for P26/40 tank units. The SMV 105/25 would also be used for counterbattery fire, while the older (and shorter-ranged) SMV 75/18 would be relegated to infantry support. It was the most heavily armed SPG in Italian service, presented a low silhouette, and was well protected and reliable and the crews generally liked it.
Only 5 gruppi (DC, DCIst, DCIInd, DCIVth and DCVth gruppi) of 12 Semoventi could be formed before armistice of September 8, 1943. Only DCIst and DCIInd based at Nettunia had their complete equipment. The Semovente M43 da 105/25 was used with the DCI Gruppo Semoventi in the 235th AT/SPA Regiment of the 135th "Ariete II" Armored Division during the defense of Rome. A battery of SMV 105/25 comprised four such AFV. About three dozen were built prior to the armistice. 26 Semovente M43 105/25 were confiscated from the Italian Army in Sept. 1943 and the Germans subsequently continued its manufacture under the name StuG M43 mit 75/34 (851) (i), with 91 more being built in 1943-44. They were used only in Italy and the Balkans. The Bassotto will also furnish strength of Squadrone Comando of the gruppo corazzato Leoncello between February and April 1945 in Polpenazze.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/8/2022 5:59:09 PM   
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43 Italian Semovente L40 da 47/32 TD B47

The Semovente L40 da 47/32 was developed by Ansaldo and built by FIAT between 1942 and 1944. It was created by mounting a Cannone da 47/32 anti-tank gun in an open-topped, box-like superstructure on a L 6/40 light tank chassis in order to increase the mobility of the 47mm gun. It was employed mainly as a TD in SMV 47/32 battalions (Gruppi Semoventi 47/32), but was usually relegated to infantry support due to its mediocre AT performance.
It was designed to allow the Bersaglieri regiments, assault infantry units of the Regio Esercito Italiano to provide direct fire support from the Cannone da 47/32 during infantry assaults without having to tow them and, secondly, to provide the Italian armored divisions with a vehicle with anti-tank performance. These self-propelled guns were used from 1942 to 1945 by Italy and Germany, as well as by the Independent State of Croatia. In total, 402 vehicles in different variants were built from 1941 onward.
A squadron of nine units was authorized in the RECo (Raggruppamento Esplorante Corazzato; armored reconnaissance task force) in the armored and motorized divisions, as were two platoons in the NEC (Nucleo Esplorante Celere; fast recon group) of certain 1943-type infantry divisions. It saw action in Russia (19 vehicles in the XIII Gruppo Semoventi 47/32 of the 3rd Celere Division), Tunisia, Sicily and Italy. At least 78 were confiscated by the Germans, who retained a small number for themselves, handed over some to the Fascist Italians, and exported the rest to Croatia. The German designation was StuG L6 47/32 630(i). A platoon comprised four such AFV (two, in an NEC). The Semovente da 47/32 was the most heavily armed Italian armoured fighting vehicle used on the Eastern Front.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/9/2022 5:27:31 PM   
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44 Italian Autosahariana AS 42 T20L

The SPA-Viberti AS.42 Sahariana, or Camionetta Desertica Model 42 (AS stands for Autosahariana) was derived from the AB 41 armored car including its four-wheel steering, but with a 2x4 transmission specifically for desert operations but, unlike the latter, was unarmored and lacked a rear driving position. Designed specifically for long-range reconnaissance in North Africa, it had an excellent cross-country range of almost 500 miles. It was also known as the Camionetta Desertica mod. 42 (Desert Weapons Carrier model 1942), and was nicknamed la Sahariana (the Saharan). The 100 horsepower SPA ABM 3 6 cylinder petrol engine was located in the rear which gave enough space in the middle of the hull to accommodate up to five fully equipped men and weapons, though the mission crew seldom exceeded three or four. The open compartment's only overhead protection was a waterproof canvas sheet. Besides the driver’s seat, the crew that served the on board weapons were seated on four folding seats on the sides. The AS 42 had internal fuel tanks of 145 litres with an additional 20 jerrycans externally mounted on both sides between the wheels plus 4 on the front fenders, holding a total of 80 litres of water and 400 litres of fuel. A full fuel tank and the additional fuel canisters allowed a maximum range of 1,500 km.
The Autosahariana was a specialized towing vehicle for artillery pieces, Italian leaders considered it a valuable asset in mobile situations. It has, however, two real drawbacks—a low infantry transport capacity, and a speed not too high (making off-road travel, with or without a gun in tow, was a slow proposition). Due to these limitations, beyond providing a tow for any on-board guns, many times it was used to transport infantry teams (HS/crews) and their heavy SW (dismantled HMGs or MTRs).
AS 42 saw action in North Africa, Sicily and Italy. Its low profile allowed it to hide behind the dunes and wait for the arrival of the enemy unseen, and its great capacity for autonomous action allowed it to chase enemy forces for long periods. After the armistice some were used by the Fascist Italians, and by the Germans (including on the Eastern Front and in the Battle of the Bulge). In all, about 200 were built.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/10/2022 5:17:12 PM   
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45 Italian Autoblindo Fiat 611B T37 AC

Designed by Ansaldo in 1932 around the Fiat 611 truck, it was adopted the following year by the Public Security Guard Corps. At the outbreak of the Abyssinian war, it was requisitioned by the Regio Esercito and sent to Somalia with the autonomous section of special armored cars, where it operated together with the older Lancia 1Z and the CV33 fast wagons. It was then used in Italian East Africa during the Second World War until the end of hostilities, with little success given the difficulty of finding spare parts and an intrinsic obsolescence of the project. The 611A had two MG in the front of the turret, while the 611B carried a medium-velocity 37mm gun instead. Both types had a MG in the rear of the turret and another in the rear hull. A total of 46 were built.
It is based on the chassis of the Fiat 611 C truck, a 6-wheel chassis with 4 twin driving rear wheels and the first 2 single, idle and directives. The spare wheels are placed in neutral between the first and second axles, in order to facilitate the overcoming of obstacles. It is characterized by the double driving position, front and rear, in order to speed up the disengagement in the event of an ambush. The armor is made of 15 mm thick steel plates. The combat compartment, equipped with slits on the sides for firing with individual weapons, is accessed by two side doors. At the rear, on the left, a window, also with an armored door, is available to the machine gunner-second conductor for driving in reverse. On the right, on the busway, 1 or 2 machine guns are installed (depending on the version) to cover the rear sector. Two armored skirts protect the rear wheels.
The crew consisted of 4-5 people: commander and cannon servant or machine gunner in the turret, a front conductor flanked by a servant-mechanic and a rear conductor-machine gunner who also activated the "fleeing" machine guns .




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/11/2022 5:31:15 PM   
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46 Italian Autoblindo AB 41 T20L AC

These two automotive advanced designs filled the requirement for modern Armored Car in the Italian Army. They featured a 4 x 4 layout with four-wheel steering and fully independent suspension, freely rotating spare wheels (midway along the sides of the hull) to help prevent "bellying" when crossing obstacles, and a rear driving position. The AB 40 carried two coaxial MG in the turret and a third MG in the rear of the superstructure; the AB 41 had a 20mm gun in place of one turret MG, as well as an increase in engine horsepower. 24 AB 40 and about 560 AB 41 were built. Made with an all-riveted construction, the AB 41 had spare wheels fitted to its sides were free to rotate, thus helping the vehicle over rough terrain and allowing it to drive over higher obstacles. It could also be fitted with wheels that would allow it to run on railway tracks and some were modified further to better serve in this role, with the addition of sand boxes and rail guards to deflect objects from the rails.
They were issued to the reconnaissance units of armored, motorized and cavalry divisions, and were also used in independent recon companies and platoons. An AB platoon comprised four such vehicles. The AB 40 was apparently used only in North Africa, while the AB 41 saw action on all major fronts (including 30 sent to Russia). The AB 41 was operated in North Africa, Yugoslavia, Italy, Hungary, and on the Eastern Front.
The Germans confiscated 37 completed AB 41 plus another 20 in production. They also seized prototypes of the AB 43, a new model with a larger turret, 47mm gun and more powerful engine. After ordering certain modifications (including a reversion to the 20mm gun), they had 102 of this type built for them, which they designated AB 41/43.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/12/2022 8:50:37 PM   
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47 Italian Autoprotetto S37 MMG AC

This APC was based on the AS 37 truck, which in turn derived from the TL 37 AS, the desertized version of the TL 37 artillery tractor. The S37 was not intended as a carrier for armored infantry, but rather as a battlefield command/supply vehicle. The overall design was simple because the vehicle on which it was based on required very little modification. The engine was at the front, allowing for a large boxy armored superstructure over the back with an open-top to provide protection for troops being carried. A very unusual split two-piece rear door provided access with the top half overlapping the lip of the bottom half of the door. Armor consisted of armored steel plates, flat and cut to size, bolted to a steel frame. Plate thickness ranged from 6 mm to 8.5 mm thick providing protection from small arms fire and shell splinters, although the lack of a roof left the soldiers vulnerable to shrapnel or fire from above. On the other hand, the lack of a roof provided a significant amount of cooling for the cabin, which otherwise, under desert conditions, would have become unbearable. About 200 were built.
A few were sent to North Africa. Despite being equipped and designed for use in hot desert conditions to support the war in North Africa, the A.S.37 found use in Yugoslavia, fighting partisans and for convoy escort duties. Vehicles were issued to the 31st Regiment (Siena), the 955th Sezione Autoprotetti with the 1118th Autosezione of the Macaerta Division, the 259th Autoreparto Autoprotetti of the 5th Autogrippo (Trento), the 1034th Sezione Autoprotetti of the 71st (LXXI) Battalion Motociclisti (6th Regiment Bersaglieri) and the 1034th Sezione Autoprotetti of the 11th Autoreparto Pesante (Albania). By the end of April 1943, there were still 102 vehicles operational there with Italian forces. The AS37 in German service was renamed Gepanzerte Manntransportwagen S.37 250(i) (gp.M.Trsp.Wg.S.37 250(i)) and saw service, not just against partisan forces, but also against the Soviets and Bulgarians at the end of the war. The A.S.37 was operated by the 7th SS-Freiwilligen-Gebirgs Division "Prinz-Eugen" and also some Wehrmacht units.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/13/2022 5:38:35 PM   
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48 Italian Autocannone da 65/17 SPA T65

These were Morris CS 8 15-cwt trucks captured from the British in North Africa and modified to carry a Infantry 65mm gun. Following the initial successes in the North African theater, the Regio Esercito italiano came into possession of numerous Morris CS8 light trucks, which, given the chronic lack of motorized vehicles, were promptly put into service as Saharan vans, in particularly as autocannons for motorized artillery groups. Were semi-artisanal vehicles, with guns far from adequate, pending the preparation of truck guns and tank destroyers of adequate power. The vehicles, as for other autocannons based on war prey vehicles, were made at the Libyan Autoraggruppamento of the 12th AS (North Africa).
A first batch of 24 CS8 armed with cannon Italian from 65/17 formed the of the Army Corps Maneuver (CAM) of the general Gastone Gambara in August 1941. Later the 65/17 autocannons on Morris CS8 came to equip 7 motorized anti-tank support batteries. Autocannoni were used throughout the North African campaign, up to the Tunisia campaign and the defeat of the Axis troops.
Two Gruppi (the XIV and XV) Autocannoni da 65/17 were formed, each of three four-gun batteries. They were assigned to the artillery of RECAM (Reparto Esplorante del Corpo d'Armata di Manovra, the Italian corps recon unit), later to the North African Fast Task Force (Raggruppamento Celere AS), and still later to the 136th "Giovani Fascisti" (Young Fascists) Division. The Italians apparently also designed other Autocannoni carrying 75mm and 100mm artillery pieces.
The endowment planned in 1941 for each battery it was four autocannons with 36 rounds on board and two CS8 ammunition holders, each with 250 rounds (half AT and half HE); some batteries were equipped with three autocannone da 65/17 CS8. In June 1942 the light motorized batteries had three 65/17 batteries for a total of 12 guns and 40 support vehicles (including 13 motorcycles), with a staff of 13 officers, 7 non-commissioned officers, 137 gunners and 56 conductors.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/14/2022 5:48:41 PM   
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49 Italian Autocannone da 20/65 AA tr T20L

The Autocannone da 20/65 were Morris CS 8 15-cwt trucks captured from the British in North Africa and modified to carry a Breda 20mm AA gun. This anti-aircraft gun was widely used by the Italian Armed forces during the war. Performing in the role of light anti-aircraft, it was also used successfully in the ground role. Like many weapons of it time it was designed as a dual-purpose weapon for use against ground and air targets. It fired armour-piercing rounds against armoured ground targets and high explosive rounds, with a very sensitive percussion fuse, against aircraft.
The crew was composed of only four crew members: the Driver, the Commander, the Gunner and the Loader. While the driver and the commander seated in the front of the cabin, the gunner and the loader mainly manned the gun, or seated in the truck-bed of the machine that, compared to the more cramped one of the Morris CS8, offered a lot more living space for the crew. A Light Anti-aircraft Platoon armed with the 20/65 autocannon is available as a Divisional Support platoon to any Italian Compagnia. The ammunition storage was placed right behind the driver (while a spare tire was placed instead behind the commander) and was composed by six separate ammo-boxes, arranged in a pyramid like formation, each one containing four clips of 12 rounds each, for a total of 288 rounds.
Two Gruppi (the XIV and XV) Autocannoni da 65/17 were formed, each of three four-gun batteries, and to each Gruppo was attached a section of four Autocannoni da 20/65. They were assigned to the artillery of Reparto Esplorante del Corpo d'Armata di Manovra, the Italian corps recon unit, later to the North African Raggruppamento Celere, and still later to the 136th "Giovani Fascisti" Division. Autocannoni da 20/65 based on various other truck types also existed.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/15/2022 5:29:50 PM   
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50 Italian Autocannone da 75/27 CK AA tr T75

The Autocannone da 75/27 CK (Cannone Krupp) originated during WW1 when the Italians mounted Krupp 75mm AA guns on trucks. It was a license-built copy of the Krupp Kanone M 1906 gun. The anti-aircraft version formed the basis of Italy's first truck mounted artillery called the Autocannone da 75/27 CK. In 1927 the same guns were remounted on more modern Ceirano vehicles, and a high-angle pedestal mount for anti-aircraft use was produced. The modello 12 was a Autocannone da 75/27 modified for greater elevation (-12° to +18° 30') and lighter weight (only 900 kg). It is one of the progenitors of all the Autocannone that Italy used during the war, opening the road for all dual-purpose guns that, until then, were only used as an AA piece, like the mighty 90mm.
The Ceirano boosted 8 crewmembers on board: the driver, the commander, 2 gunners, 2 loaders and 2 specialists, whose role was to help while setting the correct time for the Air burst shell fuse. Apart from the driver and the commander that seated in the cabin, all the other soldiers seated in the cargo bed of the truck, 2 right behind the cabin on foldable seats and the other four on a makeshift bench on the rear ammo storage during travel.
The gun was able to fire two different types of ammunition, a time-fuse flack round and, later on, the Granata Perforante 75/27, both with an initial muzzle velocity of 510m/s and a sustained rate of fire of 15 rounds per minute ( 1 shot every 4s) thanks to the 2 loaders.
24 were used by the Italians in Spain late in that country's civil war. Some also saw action in North Africa during the early stage of that campaign. A battery comprised four vehicles.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/16/2022 5:48:59 PM   
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51 Italian Autocannone da 90/53 AA tr T90L

The Autocannone da 90/53 was a Lancia 3 RO 4 x4 (or, later, a Breda Dovunque 6 x 6) heavy truck modified to carry the 90/53 AA gun. The Cannone da 90/53, derived from the naval version, was designed by Ansaldo, with the first examples being produced in 1939. 57 were ordered to be mounted on heavy trucks designated autocannoni da 90/53. Italian industry was not up to producing these quantities and by the end of production in July 1943 only 539 guns had been delivered, including 48 converted for use on the Semovente 90/53 heavy tank destroyer; some, owing to delays in producing the adequate mountings, were fitted on makeshift ones or on the flatbed of trucks like the Lancia 3Ro and the Breda 52 and were designated Autocannone Breda 52 da 90/53.
Drawing upon the German experience with the comparable 8.8 cm FlaK 18, this gun was also used as field artillery in the indirect fire role or as an anti-tank gun; in the latter role its performance was excellent, with its AP shell being able to pierce 140 millimetres of armour at 500 metres, and 120 millimetres at 1,000 metres, thus being able to destroy every Allied tank it could face in North Africa and in the mainland.
The Italians used the 90/53 as a multi-purpose weapon. The most common variant being the Lancia da 90/53, where the gun was mounted on a Lancia 3 RO 6-ton truck for ease of mobility. In this form they could be use for anti-aircraft, as an infantry support weapon or as a devastating anti-tank weapon., it appeared in 1941 and first entered combat in two Gruppi of the Ariete division's 132nd Artillery Regiment. Apparently no more (and quite possibly less) than 57 were built. A battery of 90/53 Autocannone comprised four vehicles.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/17/2022 6:49:27 PM   
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52 Italian Fiat 508 MC tr

Derived from the civilian Fiat 1100, the 508 MC (Militare Coloniale) was one of the more common field cars used by the Italians. Of 4x2 configuration, it was produced in large numbers and several different variants. However, its use was limited mainly to HQ units (e.g., a normal infantry regiment was authorized only one—for the regimental CO). In German service it was designated the 1100 Mil.
Characterized by a 2-wheel drive traction, a length of 3.6 meters and the reliable 1.100cc 4-cylinders engine, capable of delivering 32 hp that allowed it to reach 90 Km / h, Fiat “Coloniale” was especially used for the mobility of officers and for HQ operations in North Africa. However, the overall strength of the vehicle, the bigger size of the tires, and the good mechanics reliability, had made Fiat “Coloniale” suitable for advanced reconnaissance duties in off-road terrain. Produced between 1939 and 1945, the Fiat 1100 'Torpedo Militare' or Fiat 508CM was based on the civilian Fiat Balilla. The 508CM had a higher clearance and a military body and was produced cheaply. The "Coloniale" version of the 508 was adapted to avoid sinking in soft terrain and taking in sand. It was capable of 80km/h and had reasonable cross country performance. Some Fiat 508 CMs were fitted with an Allocchio Bacchini radio transmitter and receiver located in the boot. It had two antennas, one on the rear and one on the grille, connected by a cable.
The first public presentation of the Fiat 508 CM took place at the inauguration of the Mirafiori plant on May 15, 1939, where the military vehicles manufactured by Fiat were on display. Manufacturing began that year and priority was given to delivering the motorized units to the controls. In 1943, 6,000 copies had already been produced. They were employed on all fronts, including in North Africa between 1940 and 1941.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/18/2022 8:03:22 PM   
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53 Italian Autocarri Leggero tr 4,5 ton

The Italian Army possessed many diverse types and makes of trucks, and for this reason in Heroes and Leaders mod the units generically represent the light (Leggero), medium (Medio) and heavy (Pesante) classes. The payload capacity and minimum top speed of the latter two were standardized in 1937, but otherwise the manufacturers were largely free to use whatever engines, tires, etc. they wished. This, along with the existence of many vehicles produced prior to the standardization policy, caused no end of problems with spare parts. Italy began the war with some 42,000 vehicles (excluding cars and motor-cycles), and through mid 1943 produced about 108,000 cars, trucks and artillery tractors. Generally speaking, motor transport was in short supply at all levels throughout the war. Efforts were made to keep at least the forces in North Africa and Russia at full establishment, but production could not keep up with losses despite receiving Opel Blitz and French Citroen trucks from the Germans. Even pressing into service as much captured British transport as possible could not greatly alleviate the transport shortage in Africa. Aside from a few specialized types, the Italians generally did not use trucks to tow their artillery.
The SPA AS.37 was an Italian military light truck, used during World War II. The AS.37 Autocarro Sahariano was developed from 1937 on the frame of the TL.37 artillery tractor and was especially conceived to be employed in the North African desert. The most significant improvement of this new vehicle was its increased range: 900 km with added water tanks. The A.S.37 could transport 8 men and their equipment in its rear cargo box. In March 1942, 584 A.S.37 were in service, and by April 30, 1943 a total of 802 were in service in North Africa. The crews of A.S.37 put forth very favourable judgements on these vehicles; their four-wheel drive and large diameter wheels prevented them from becoming easily bogged down. The A.S.37 principal defect lay in a silhouette too high and thus too visible.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/19/2022 5:25:43 PM   
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54 Italian Autocarri Medio tr 7,5 ton

The Fiat 626 was an Italian medium truck that met specifications for the Italian army and air force for military operations prior to World War II. In 1939, the 626 was the first FIAT truck with forward control and it replaced the models 621 and 633. The initial version of the 626 for civilian use was the 626N ("N" for Nafta, the Italian for diesel). This was followed by a slightly longer wheelbase version the 626NL (from Nafta Lungo - "diesel long"). The military version for the Italian Army and the Italian Air Force was the 626NLM (for Nafta Lungo Militare). It had a fuel capacity of 90 liters which gave him a range of 400 Km road (340 Km cross country) and was equipped with a Fiat 326 engine 6-cylinder 5,750 cc. The Fiat 626 NLM differed from the civilian model by the presence of the differential lock, air filter and oil, among other improvements. This model had different roles as the basic version with the wooden box for transport 3-ton capacity, tanker, field kitchen, ambulance and tow truck transmissions, among others. In 1941 an armored protected with light armor plating cabin while the rear box, outdoors, became a combat camera infantry protected at the sides by armor plates with portholes model was manufactured. This version was a modification of campaign although similar changes by the Germans in particular were also used to fight against the partisans.
A reliable workhorse, the FIAT 626 became the standard Italian medium truck and operated on all fronts.
The Fiat 626 NLM operated in Italian North Africa (1940–1943), Italian East Africa (1940–1941), the Balkans (1940–1944), France (1940–1944), and Soviet Union (1941-1943/44). France ordered 1,650 trucks; 700 had been delivered by the time Italy declared war on June 10, 1940. By 31 January 1945 3,000 had been produced for German use.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/20/2022 7:43:30 PM   
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55 Italian Autocarri Pesante tr 11 ton

The Lancia 3Ro 4x2 heavy truck evolved from the earlier Lancia Ro by receiving a stronger five cylinder engine to replace two and three cylinder engines, pneumatic tires and an improved transmission; it is best known for its role as one of the main Royal Italian Army in World War II. The Lancia 3 Ro's design was simple, functional and was considered the most reliable heavy truck of the Royal Italian Army in World War II serving in all theatres of the war.
The 3Ro used a ladder frame and leaf spring-suspended solid axles front and rear. Powering diesel 3Ro was a Lancia Tipo 102 6,875 cc straight-five diesel engine, with two parallel overhead valves per cylinder, which developed 93 hp at 1,860 rpm. Like on the Ro the transmission used a 4-speed plus reverse gearbox complemented by a low range gearing, for a total of 8 forward and 2 reverse speeds. Brakes were servo-assisted, mechanically operated drums on all four wheels, plus hydraulic emergency hand brake also on all four wheels.
Over the course of the war many variants of the military 3Ro were made: troop transport, supply transport, 5,000-litre fuel tanker, 4,000-litre water tanker, mobile repair workshop, anti-aircraft, and self-propelled gun.
In North Africa and Sicily with the top of the cab cut away and lower sideboards the Lancia 3 Ro became well suited for desert warfare serving as a self-propelled gun porting the Cannone da 90/53 as well as the 100/17 howitzer. German armed forces always in need of supplies and material made use of any Ro and 3Ro as well as any other equipment, Italian or otherwise, that came into their possession.
After the Italian armistice of September 8, 1943, the Wehrmacht absorbed commandeered Ro and 3Ro trucks from their former ally. In April 1944 with the Lancia factory in German controlled Italy, German armed forces placed an order for 772 3Ro built between January 1944 and February 1945.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/21/2022 5:38:36 PM   
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56 Italian Bicyclists

No soldiers are more identifiably “Italian” than the Bersaglieri. For over a hundred years the Italian Bersaglieri have impressed their allies and terrified their foes on battlefields in wars across the globe. Other armies, for some time, had been developing rifle companies and light infantry to act as scouts, screen for the main army, act as skirmishers and to use their sharp-shooting skills to weaken the flanks of the enemy during a battle.
As light infantry, speed and mobility was always prized and by World War I this meant that several companies of each Bersaglieri battalion were mounted on bicycles. Eventually these were traded-in for motorcycles which saw widespread use in World War II. During the Second Italo-Abyssinian War Bersaglieri troops mounted on both bicycles and motorcycles were grouped together with cavalry and motorized units to form ‘Celere’ mobile (or fast) divisions and such units saw service throughout the Second World War as well.
During World War II in North Africa and in Russia the Bersaglieri were often grouped into armored divisions to provide a fast-moving infantry support for the tanks, a function in which they performed heroically and often took very heavy casualties carrying out.
When mechanization came one Bersaglieri regiment was attached to each armored division and their courage and fighting spirit became legendary. The famous German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel remarked that, “The German soldier has impressed the world, however, the Italian Bersagliere soldier has impressed the German soldier.” He was a man often critical of his superiors as well as his subordinates but praised the Bersaglieri on numerous occasions, such as the heroic actions of the 7th Bersaglieri Regiment in the victory over the Americans at the battle of Kasserine Pass. Their contribution was also absolutely vital to one of Rommel’s most significant victories at Mersa Matruh.




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RE: Heroes and Leaders mod - 2/22/2022 6:24:18 PM   
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57 Italian Cavalry

The 1st Cavalry Division "Eugenio di Savoia" (1ª Divisione celere "Eugenio di Savoia") was a cavalry or "Celere" division of the Royal Italian Army during World War II. The Eugenio di Savoia was mobilized in 1940 and took part in the Invasion of Yugoslavia.
The division was formed on 17 April 1930 as 1st Fast Division in the city of Udine in Friuli. The division is considered to be the heir of the 1st Cavalry Division of Friuli, which fought in World War I and consisted of the I and II cavalry brigades and was based in Udine. On 15 June 1930 the I Cavalry Brigade, with the regiments Regiment "Cavalleggeri di Saluzzo" (12th), "Cavalleggeri di Monferrato" (13th), and "Cavalleggeri di Alessandria" (14th) entered the division.
In January 1933 the Regiment "Piemonte Reale Cavalleria" (2nd) replaced the Regiment "Cavalleggeri di Monferrato" (13th). On 1 January 1934 the division and brigade received the name "Eugenio di Savoia". On the same date the brigade was reorganized with the Regiment "Cavalleggeri di Alessandria" (14th) being replaced by the 11th Bersaglieri Regiment, and the I Light Tank Group "San Giusto" joining the brigade.
On 30 March 1941 the division ceded its 1st Fast Artillery Regiment with the II and III motorized groups to the 27th Infantry Division "Brescia", which was fighting in the Western Desert Campaign. On 3 April the Regiment "Nizza Cavalleria" (1st) was attached to the division for the upcoming Invasion of Yugoslavia. Afterwards the division remained in Yugoslavia as occupation force.
On 17 October 1941 the Regiment "Cavalleggeri di Alessandria" (14th) conducted the last cavalry charge by an Italian military unit: encircled by a group of Yugoslav Partisans near Poloj in Croatia the regiment launched repeated night-time sabre charges against the partisans and despite suffering heavy casualties, the charge succeeded and the regiment broke through the encirclement.




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